Men’s Hair Restoration

/Men's Hair Restoration

Is Stress The Cause Of Your Hair Loss?

Men's anguish from hair loss isn't precisely newsworthy, yet finding the reason for their hair loss can be groundbreaking. Heredity is typically the guilty party and most men credit it to terrible genes. What a few men don't understand is that their male pattern baldness isn't fundamentally foreordained by hereditary qualities and that push could be capable. Telogen effluvium is a hair loss condition activated by stressful or traumatic affairs like an accident, a serious sickness, or a life-changing event. This condition can make hair essentially quit developing or drop out. At the end of the day the anxiety powers hair follicles to sit in the resting stage, which will stop hair development and inevitably the influenced hair could be lost months after the fact. On the off chance that you've encountered an life-changing event and you're experiencing male pattern baldness, do your best to minimize the source of anxiety. Concentrate on moving beyond the occasion and work towards mending. It is additionally essential to get enough rest and eat right amid this time. At long last, make sure to see a male pattern baldness proficient who can comfort your psyche and assist you with affirming the reason for male pattern baldness and give you genuine solutions. Try not to let the anxiety of male pattern baldness add to your anxiety. The most ideal approach to figure out which balding solution is a good fit for you is to meet secretly with an expert at Van Scoy Hair Clinic. A typical conference takes around 60 minutes. We will get in touch with you to plan you're private, no commitment conference during a time that is most advantageous for you.   Photo Credit: Michael Clesle via [...]

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What’s the difference between Male and Female Pattern Baldness?

Among the many biological occurrences that manifest differently for men and women, one that is especially different is cycles of hair loss. The idea of male pattern hair loss (MPHL) is widely known and often discussed. But just as there are measurable configurations of male baldness, there exist patterns for female hair loss as well. In fact, over 55% of women experience some measure of hair loss throughout their lives. Just as Hamilton and Norwood developed a scale for male hair loss (developed by Hamilton in the 1950’s then updated by Norwood in the 1970’s), in 1977 Ludwig developed a similar scale for female pattern baldness. Though there are other scales for both MPHL and female pattern hair loss (FPHL), these two are the most popular among practitioners and researchers when attempting to classify hair loss. The Hamilton-Norwood scale: The Hamilton-Norwood scale has seven types of classifications and several stages within those classifications. For example, within stage 5 there are 3 levels of progression including 5, 5A, and 5V, which show variations on a receding hairline with hair loss also in the crown of a man’s head. Androgenetic alopecia, or MPHL, can begin for some men even in their teens and continue on throughout their life. The rate and onset of androgentic alopecia is highly individualized. However, it is widely accepted that there are biological determinants for hair loss and the best indicator of a man’s potential for hair loss is in his family history. The Ludwig scale: The Ludwig scale has three primary classifications that display thinning hair, diffuse hair loss, as well as frontal hairline recession. Each image in the scale display a woman’s head with her hair parted down the middle. As [...]

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October 1 Begins Trichotillomania Awareness Week

Trichotillomania is a prime example of the type of hair loss disorder that can benefit tremendously from an awareness week. Despite notable prevalence in the United States (2-4% of the population), Trichotillomania remains under the radar for most individuals, including many quality stylists and medical professionals. This lack of awareness fuels misunderstanding and shame while simultaneously impeding personal progress and community support. So let’s spread the awareness! First, what is Trichotillomania? Well, this mouthful of a disorder is pronounced trick-oh-till-oh-MAY-nee-ah, but most people shorten it to simply trich or TTM. What a relief, right? Trich involves the BFRB (body-focused repetitive behavior) of chronic, compulsive hair pulling. It can include hairs on the scalp, face, arms, legs, and pubic area and can feel like anything from a strong, distracting urge to an entirely unnoticed action. There is a lot of variation in its manifestation. People of all ages have been diagnosed with Trichotillomania. It impacts both males and females, but by adulthood, prevalence is much higher in women. Trich is found in happy, well adjusted individuals as well as those whose pulling began as a result of high levels of anxiety or stress. According to the Trichotillomania Learning Center (TLC), “preliminary evidence indicates TTM is a nuero-biological disorder and that genetics may play a role in its development.” Treatments and solutions vary from coping mechanisms and resource support to therapies and medication applications. A definitive cure does not yet exist. How can you participate in Trichotillomania Awareness Week? Understand the need for awareness. Like the TLC, we want to “envision a world where BFRBs are not a source of shame, and treatment that works is accessible to everyone.” The more we talk about trich, the more [...]

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Three Men’s Hair Styles for Fall 2014

Fall is upon us, and with the change of seasons comes a change of styles. Yes, green leaves are turning orange, hot summer days are cooling into enjoyable autumn ones, and short-sleeved shirts are being covered by sweaters. Why not go with the flow of the shifting seasons and their sweeping transformations this year and opt for a new do to usher in the autumn months? Today we highlight three trendy men’s styles to consider for this coming fall. If you are struggling with hair thinning or loss and are seeking a way to keep your look current, schedule a free consultation with one of our specialists today. Go for Lift The pompadour has been popular all year (and worldwide, as we noted during this summer’s Cup), and the style is still going strong as we swing into fall. Consider an undercut of any variety, which allows for whatever combination of lift and length you prefer. This prohibition cut featured on Behind the Chair is a slick look for the working man while the looser version shown on Men’s Hair Style Trends can be perfect for a relaxed evening. Already rocking an undercut? Try pairing it with a beard as the months get cooler. A Caesar with Bangs If a typical Caesar is your go to style, make the jump from average to awesome this autumn by simply allowing a bit more length in front. This small shift can make a man look stylish without much styling, and your hairdresser can work the change in over time by allowing for more drama every time you come in for your next cut. Perhaps you will decide you are happy with just a little bit of additional [...]

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Another Alopecia Areata Drug Breakthrough

(source: http://newsroom.cumc.columbia.edu/blog/2014/08/17/fda-approved-drug-restores-hair-patients-alopecia-areata/) Right on the heels of June’s alopecia universalis breakthrough comes a second publication announcing good news for those suffering from the spectrum of alopecia areata diseases. An August article in Nature Medicine from a team out of New York’s Columbia University presents the successful use of the drug ruxolitinib for treatment of alopecia areata in three patients with varying degrees of hair loss. Ruxolitinib is a JAK inhibitor approved by the FDA for use in treating a bone marrow cancer called myelofibrosis. It, along with tofacitinib citrate (which we featured here after it made big news in June), was identified by the Columbia University team as having potential applications in alopecia areata due its ability to block certain immune pathways that have been found to be responsible for the autoimmune attacks on hair follicles. The progress was undeniable as the result of two 20mg doses per day for five months was ‘complete restoration’ in all three initial trials. Additionally, the expectation is that this medication will re-establish a full mane during treatment and can then be discontinued, essentially providing a cure rather than an indefinite drug regimen. These results inspire huge amounts of hope! Researchers are quick to point out the need for further investigation as these newly opened doors prompt questions regarding the continued consistency of results, short and long term side effects, and the comparisons between the two drugs being actively tested. Despite the numerous directions for future research though, the results published in this latest study have enormous implications for what Dr. Angela Christiano, a co-lead study author from Columbia University, describes as “a tremendously large and motivated population of patients who have no other treatments available.” You [...]

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Top 10 Ways July is More Fun with Hair

It’s summer and it’s hot, but you’re avoiding the pool. You worry about what sweat and wind will do to your thinning hair while out at barbeques. Getting caught in the rain would be tragic. It is no surprise that July would be more fun with hair. Here we have selected the top ten ways that the month would be more enjoyable after restoration. 1. Swimming The typical avoidance of wet locks in public by those with thinning hair or bald spots puts the kibosh on classic summer fun in the pool. Whether you swim for exercise, to cool off, or just for the fun and games, being comfortable diving into the water is a wonderfully positive attribute for anyone’s summer. 2. After Swimming Swimming isn’t the only fun part of taking a dip though. Jumping out of the water and doing a quick self-dry with a flip of the mane or a full head shake inspires a youthful energy that should grace every summer. 3. Summer Rains Spontaneous showers and summer thunderstorms can spell tragedy for an individual with thinning hair. Jumping in puddles or spur-of-the-moment rain dances are things of the past. With a full head of hair though, getting caught in the rain can be a laughable inconvenience at worst and movie-esque romantic at best. 4. Going Hat-Free From beach bonnets to baseball caps, there are some really great summer hats out there. Having to wear one for the entire duration of the hot bright months though is a total drag. Next July, make hats an option rather than a crutch. 5. Fewer Scalp Burns Maybe you’ve already said goodbye to the everyday cap. Instead, you rely on your sunscreen and suffer through [...]

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Arthritis Drug Allows Man with Alopecia Universalis to Grow Hair

Dr. Brett King, researcher and dermatologist at Yale University, has been on the lips of individuals throughout medical and scientific communities recently as word spreads about his undeniable success helping a patient with alopecia universalis to grow hair on his scalp, face, and body using an already approved rheumatoid arthritis drug called tofacitinib citrate (Pfizer namebrand Xeljanz). The drug, which was approved by the FDA in 2012, is an enzyme inhibitor that functions by impeding certain signals that play roles in the autoimmune disorders that it has been used to treat thus far. It has been used to combat alopecia in mice before, but never in humans. Images from Dr. King's findings. Click for the article in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Kyle Rhodes, Dr. King’s 25-year-old patient, was diagnosed with alopecia areata when he was 2 years old, and the disorder had developed into its rarest form by the time he was 18. His concurrent diagnosis of plaque psoriasis was the main driving factor behind his referral to the Yale dermatologist. Seeking to help his patient to combat both plaque psoriasis and alopecia universalis, Dr. King prescribed 10mg of Xeljanz for two months followed by a slightly increased dosage thereafter. “The best available science suggested this might work, and it has,” he said, crediting Columbia University scientist Angela Christiano’s work for leading him to try the new form of therapy. Though this is the first successful application of the drug for the treatment of alopecia, Dr. King is optimistic about future trials and is pursuing further research via his submission of a proposal for clinical trials of tofacitinib in cream form. “This is a huge step forward in the treatment of patients [...]

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3 Hair Transplant FAQs

Does it work? Does it hurt? How much does it cost? There are a lot of questions to be asked regarding your decision to commit to hair transplantation for your primary hair restoration solution, but a large percentage of the numerous and various inquiries that initially come to mind when beginning to consider the process fall into one of these three broad categories. When reviewing options, it is typical and intelligent to seek out effective and efficient choices. Hair transplantation is naturally a more complicated procedure, and yet, its level of effectiveness and efficiency continues to make it Van Scoy’s most popular hair loss solution. So, does it work, does it hurt, and how much does it cost? Let’s take a look… Does Hair Transplantation Work? Of course! Hair transplantation is most commonly used for Male Pattern Baldness and Female Pattern Hair Loss, but it can also be performed for other permanent hair loss situations such as traumas or burns. During the procedure, hair is removed from areas of permanent growth and transferred to balding areas, also often referred to as a transfer from a donor site to a recipient site. This means that the new hairs are the natural hairs of the individual undergoing the transplant! Initially, moved hairs fall out prior to fresh, new growth in the recipient region that begins within 3 to 5 months. The hair that grows in here is exactly like the hair from the donor region. Transplanted follicular units maintain the color, texture, life cycle, and anticipated future growth patterns that they would have had they never been moved. For the most natural appearance, specialists will work with their patients to find their appropriate hair density, which often [...]

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Finding Your Solution: Laser Treatments

There are a number of solutions available for specific types of hair loss and styling needs, and speaking with a specialist is the best way to decide which hair restoration avenue is the best for you. Today, Van Scoy takes a look at 4 common questions associated with laser treatments. “I thought laser treatments were for hair removal! How can they serve both purposes?” Good question! Lasers can indeed work for both hair removal and restoration and have been used for removal for decades while their approved application for restoration is relatively recent. There are various types and levels of lasers though, and those disparities along with the way in which they are applied produce different results. Laser hair removal, for example, involves purposeful, targeted damaging of follicles at a specific wavelength. Laser hair treatments for restoration, on the other hand, use low level, therapeutic, soft, “cold” lasers to deliver light energy to the scalp and generate blood flow rather than damage. In fact, similar lasers have been used for wound healing for a long time. “Will there be any cutting or burns?” No. Laser treatments are non-invasive, non-surgical, non-burning, and non-painful. “What can I expect my overall treatment experience to look like?” Your hair restoration specialist will work with you to set a regular schedule for office visits. Each person is different, but this often means 2-3 sessions of 10-20 minutes per week for 3-12 months. During the treatments, you can simply relax, read a magazine, and take a small break from the day. If you are unable to make regular appointments, at-home treatments are also available. Van Scoy Hair Clinics recommends that laser hair therapy be approached as a 3-step treatment program, which means ongoing attentiveness [...]

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What to Expect After Hair Transplant Surgery

You’ve worked with your hair restoration specialist and learned that a hair transplant could be a good option for you. The highly trained staff has provided you with a good understanding of the upcoming process. Now what can you expect after the surgery? Great question. 2 Weeks Prior to the procedure, your specialist will have provided you with post-operative care instructions. These instructions will include a variety of directives, from scalp care and activity level monitoring to the use of cold compresses and recommended pillow position. Review them well and follow them carefully. The scalp may feel tight and achy immediately following the surgery, but this can be controlled by basic medications, and pain killers, if used, are rarely required for more than a day or two. Swelling, often in the forehead, should be expected for the first week. Scabbing too is common during the first week, but this crust begins falling away within days. Any dressings that your surgeon used will be in place only for a day or two. If stitches were used, they are removed or dissolved after 10 days. Your specialist will provide you with specific shampooing instructions, which begin within days of the surgery, as regular washing plays an important role in keeping the area clear of dirt, blood, oil, and crusts which are often inadvertently removed with gentle cleansing. The area will itch, especially the first few days after the surgery. This is normal, but it can be harmful to the transplanted follicles to scratch or rub them vigorously. Keeping the area moist can help decrease this itch, and your specialist will have a recommendation for how to best do this for your scalp. Expect to stay away from [...]

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